Paul A Young’s Sea-Salted Chocolate and Pecan Tart Recipe Review

Paul A Young sea-salted chocolate and pecan tartI was leafing through Paul A Young‘s Adventures with Chocolate recipe book and decided I HAD to bake this dark chocolate sea-salted and pecan tart (recipe online here)! The photo was just too irresistible! I made this for a week day dinner party last week but it did require baking it over two days so I’d recommend considering it for a weekend dinner party. The pastry is easy to create and using a food processor makes it super easy. I used medium yolks. I left it in the fridge for over an hour then rolled it out and left about a couple of inches spare so that the pasty overhung my dish and then cut off a bit of the excess. Next up another rest in the fridge for 15mins. I actually think it might be worth resting it for half an hour as I found my pastry did shrink a bit in the oven.

chocolate pastryI cooked the pastry at 160 degrees in a fan oven which was defo the right temperature for my oven atleast. I baked it for the full 20mins then another 8 mins and let it cool overnight. The next day I made the filling and popped it in the fridge before the dinner guests arrived. Now time to make the topping. Pour 100g of caster sugar in a small saucepan on a medium heat. Then don’t touch it. I know it sounds bonkers how can dry sugar turn liquid but it’s like magic! Keep that spoon far away from this sugar! Literally don’t touch it. Very slowly you’ll see the edges of the sugar start to liquefy and change colour. Give the pan a little shake to encourage the non-melted sugar to merge with the liquid bits. Very slowly you’ll start to get a nice golden brown caramel emerge. This Guardian article gives some nice tips on how to make different types of caramel.

chocolate and pecan tartThen pour it over halved pecans. It forms a lovely gooey caramel and quickly hardens. These are fab to sprinkle over the choc filling and it gives it a lovely crunch and texture and breaks up the monotony of the dark choc colour. Place on a big cake plate and watch your dinner guests’ eyes fill with glee! It serves 8 people as it’s very rich but boy was this a wonderful dessert!

Landmark Hotel afternoon tea review

Selection of finger sandwiches and miniature cakes at the Landmark HotelToday I was fortunate enough to be invited to afternoon tea at the Landmark Hotel in Marylebone. We were met with a calming atmosphere as we walked in the atrium style room known as the Winter Garden restaurant. Piano music drifted from the mezzanine as we chatted. Three of us chose the Landmark Hotel afternoon tea which included a glass of Tattinger champagne for £40. We were met with a traditional three tiered cake stand with four types of finger sandwiches and 10 miniature cakes. The second round of cakes included a basket of warm scones with strawberry jam and whipped cream. I was absolutely stuffed by the end! This was shared between two of us. The afternoon tea is generous on tea and coffee – each person is given a large teapot each and I had a full cafetiere of coffee.The waiter also gave us second helpings of sandwiches. I particularly enjoyed the coronation chicken ones which were very fresh and tasty. On to the cakes! My favourites were the passionfruit dome, not dissimilar to a chilled mouse on a little biscuit, the chocolate and kahlua millefeuille, the crunchy caramel eclair and the petite carrot cake. The scones were warm and soft and came apart easily in two parts. My colleagues said the orange cupcake frosting was a bit hard and dry and the odd salmon sandwich had slightly dry bread but these were minor points. The only limiting factor was the size of my stomach; I didn’t manage all the miniature cakes but I made a hearty attempt at eating atleast six of them! The Landmark also does a chocolate afternoon tea but this wasn’t available today. I’d love to go back and review it. Overall a fabulous afternoon tea in a relaxing setting. And I’ve just returned from a freezing hockey training to burn off the cakes!

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